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Recovering the Reformed Confession

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  • 12/14/12--05:00: Oh That Tullian! (2)
  • Oh That Tullian (Part 1) The fellow who seems to be in the crosshairs of the “concerned” lately is my friend Tullian Tchividjian, senior pastor of Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church (PCA). He’s also associated with Liberate and he blogs there and at . . . Continue reading →

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    What’s the difference between legalism and antinomianism? The latter is the denial of the abiding validity of God’s moral law for the life of the believer. The church has been afflicted with antinomianism throughout its history. All the Gnostics of the 2nd . . . Continue reading →

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    In Part 1 we looked at the distinction between law and gospel and the first two of the three uses of the law. The third use is the normative or the moral use, whereby the moral life of the believer is normed . . . Continue reading →

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    As a follow-up to the post on legal preaching Chris Gordon and I sat down in the Abounding Grace Radio studio to talk through the issue of the attraction of legal preaching. Once again, neither the post nor the episode is a . . . Continue reading →

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    On the next Heidelcast, which goes out later tonight, we take up the thorny topic of conditions in the covenant of grace. By nature grace is unconditional. If we must meet a condition to receive grace then what we receive is not . . . Continue reading →

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    Part 1. Many of us have spent time in forms of Christianity that are very strong on rules and slavery and very weak on grace and freedom. By “rules and slavery” I refer to the imposition of man-made rules by which sanctity . . . Continue reading →

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    Controversy can be ugly and painful and the recent controversy over sanctification has been both at times. It can also be helpful by bringing greater clarity and this controversy has been useful in that respect. Some orthodox Reformed pastors are being charged . . . Continue reading →

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    Last time we considered what some folk mean by the expression “the law of Christ” and, in contrast, what the Bible means by it. It’s neither a new covenant of works, as if we could obey our way into acceptance with God . . . Continue reading →

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    Before I began this series my intent was to do a series of episodes on the Reformed understanding of the Christian use of the moral law as the norm or rule of the Christian life. Confessional Protestants (Reformed and Lutheran) call it . . . Continue reading →

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    Ver. 24. Which things are a typical history; for these two women represent the two covenants, with the churches thereto adhering respectively; the one from Mount Sinai, to wit, the covenant of works, which was given there, and where the Jewish synagogue, . . . Continue reading →

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    As I urged you when I was going to Macedonia, remain at Ephesus so that you may charge certain persons not to teach any strange doctrine, who hold useless speculations,  nor to pay attention to myths and endless genealogies, rather than the . . . Continue reading →

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    The charge of legalism against the covenant of works is one of those allegations that seems persuasive at first because we all know that legalism is bad and that grace is good. It is almost instinctive to react to the charge by asserting the graciousness of the covenant of works. That is a trap, however, into which we ought not step. Continue reading →

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    Listen to the latest episode of the White Horse Inn on the sufficiency of Scripture. About half-way through, before the break, Kim Riddlebarger makes a great point about the connection between legalistic, conservative evangelicals, and what I call the Quest for Illegitimate . . . Continue reading →

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  • 03/05/08--15:13: Legalism Kills
  • here

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  • 03/08/08--12:50: A Catechism on Legalism
  • At AH

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    of the 613 mitzvoth, the temple laws were fulfilled in Christ but the dietary laws are still in force for Christians? I’ve never been very good at arguing with cultists and I had a long conversation the other day with a neo-Judaizer who . . . Continue reading →

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    Martin helps us steer clear of “communities of performance.”

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    Thanks to the James Durham Thesis for posting this encouragement and reminder that the way of Reformed orthodoxy is neither antinomian nor legalist.

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    Mutatis mutandis you’ll see the point (HT: AR).

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    For Christians who believe God’s Word, the Holy Scriptures and who confess the Reformed faith there can be no question whether we ought to live the Christian life. The question is, however, how do we live the Christian life? From where do . . . Continue reading →

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